Sir Edward Requests Gainsborough’s NatWest Bank Branch Remains Open

Sir Edward Leigh, the veteran Member of Parliament for Gainsborough, has written to the Chairman of the National Westminster Bank plc., Sir Howard Davis, to urge the bank, in the strongest possible terms, to reconsider its decision to close the branch in Gainsborough’s Market Place.

The constituency, which Sir Edward has represented for near thirty-five years, has suffered closure of all its NatWest branches except that in Gainsborough. Both the branches in Caistor and Market Rasen have been permanently closed in recent years. This additional closure is a terrible blow for the town. Sir Edward said:

“Towns like Gainsborough are facing growing pressures but also opportunities. Gainsborough in particular has featured redevelopments like Marshall’s Yard which have brought life and business into the town.

“Gainsborough is expected to see economic growth of 12% in future years, supported by an increase in housing of 47%. As the town moves from a modest population of around 20,000 to in excess of 30,000, it is a growing and important urban centre and one that would benefit from retaining its NatWest branch.”

Sir Edward, in his letter, also pointed out that whilst branch banking is on the decline, nevertheless many older constituents, who are less likely to use internet banking, prefer face-to-face contact in bank branches.

The MP has requested that the decision is revisited and offered to have a meeting with Sir Howard to discuss the matter.

Posted by Edward Leigh's Office | December 7th, 2017


The flat tax would be good for Britain

Simplifying tax would help small business, increase government revenue, and make us more free

The following essay of mine is printed in The Future of Conservatism, a new book edited by David Davis MP, Brian Binley MP, and John Baron MP.

The UK has a labyrinthine tax system. Much of the responsibility for this lies with the last Labour government, which burdened British citizens and businesses with over 5,000 pages of new tax rules and regulations. The result; our Tax Code has more than doubled in size since 1997, recently surpassing India’s to become the largest in the world.

This has allowed the growth of an entire industry to discover tax loopholes. The TUC claims tax avoidance costs the Treasury £13 billion per year in lost tax from individuals, and £12 billion per year in unpaid tax from businesses. This dwarfs the estimated £1 billion a year lost as a result of benefit fraud.

With the Coalition Government forced to make tough choices about public spending in order to reduce the deficit, we need to consider not just what the government spends money on, but also how the government raises taxes in the first place. If we really want a simpler tax system, we should implement a flat tax for both individuals and businesses.

This is how it would work. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by Edward Leigh | October 3rd, 2011


Column: New Year’s Day 2011

It is pleasing to see such busy shops during the Christmas sales. Our recovery will be driven by a freer financial environment.

The wealth of virtually every developed society in history has depended on a free interaction between market supply and public demand. It is amazing, therefore, to see this basic balance ignored by educated politicians whose egos and ideology stand in the way of progress. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted by Edward Leigh | January 1st, 2011





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